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Biblical Studies

BIB1121 How to Study the Bible

This is a practical course about how to study the Bible step-by- step. The course introduces you to methods and tools for serious Bible study using English Bibles. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of each book of the New Testament.
  • Use the four-step method of devotional Bible study described in the textbook.
  • Conduct an expository Bible study, applying sound principles of interpretation.
  • Discuss the main divisions, the text, and the World of the New Testament.
  • Define ‘the synoptic problem’ and describe the most popular current solution.
  • Demonstrate understanding of evangelical principles of Bible interpretation.
  • Conduct a devotional study of a Bible passage using the method presented in the "Devotional Study Workflow."
  • Conduct an in-depth study of a Bible passage using the method presented in the "Passage Study Workflow."

BIB1122 1 Corinthians

This course provides an in-depth study of the exhilarating Acts of the Apostles, the Early Church, and of the Holy Spirit. This subject paint a portrait of how Christianity burst onto the scenes of the Judea-Greco-Roman world. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  • See how Paul addresses a variety of practical problems in the Corinthian church.
  • Notice how Paul grappled with issues like unity in diversity, sexual purity, marriage and divorce, freedom and responsibility, spiritual gifts, and more.
  • Apply Paul’s correctives to errand beliefs and behaviors relevant to the church today.
  • Contextualize and solve practical theological problems.

BIB1123 The Words and Works of Jesus

This course provides a closer look at the life and ministry of Jesus that inform the Church and Christian workers' witness. By the end of this course you will be able to:
  • Reconstruct the life of Christ, harmonizing the four gospel accounts, and placing events in approximate chronological order.
  • Demonstrate excellent general knowledge of the content of the four gospels.
  • Correctly interpret specific teachings and events in the life and ministry of Jesus Christ.
  • Explain the differences between similar passages in different gospels.

BIB1124 Old Testament Survey

The objective of an Old Testament Survey is to provide an interpretive framework for understanding the Old Testament so that you can begin to feel at home in its pages. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  • Summarise the content and structure of the Old Testament in a memorable manner.
  • Examine briefly the canon and languages of the Old Testament.
  • Examine the effects of sin on Old Testament society.
  • Examine redemption as a definitive aspect of Israel’s history.

BIB2121 Hermeneutics (Prerequisite for PRA2123)

The very nature of Scripture as the Word of God is communication, and thus, requires interpretation. To grow in these skills, students need to learn the appropriate tools and processes of analysis, and to practice the use of such devices and methods.

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Appreciate the necessity of hermeneutics for ministry.
  • Identify the significant historical systems of Biblical interpretation.
  • Apply the principles of evangelical hermeneutics.

BIB2122 The Pentateuch

The Pentateuch is foundational to the Jewish and Christian faith. This course provides you with an overview of the Pentateuch aiming to arouse your interest in the world of the Old Testament. Equipped with a measure of background information, you will begin to comprehend more clearly the purpose of God for humanity as it unfolds in the Bible. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  • Discuss the historical background and composition of the Pentateuch.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the literary structure, historical context, major themes, and theological implications of each book of the Pentateuch.

BIB2123 The Historical Books

This course provides an overview of the twelve Old Testament books from Joshua to Esther. This preliminary study of the Old Testament aims to introduce themes, purposes, and historical background to the historical books. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how to interpret narrative texts soundly.
  • Express informed convictions regarding introductory issues (e.g., author, date, purpose, unity).
  • Demonstrate familiarity with the content of each of the historical books.
  • Correctly interpret specific teachings and events in the life and ministry of Jesus Christ.
  • Explain the theological purpose and perspective of individual historical books.

BIB2124 The Book of Acts

This course provides an in-depth study of the exhilarating Acts of the Apostles, the Early Church, and of the Holy Spirit. This subject paints a portrait of how Christianity burst onto the scenes of the Judea-Greco-Roman world. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify the essential principles presented in the book.
  • Have a general understanding of the whole text of the book.
  • Determine the meaning of the more difficult passages in the book.
  • Originate practical applications for the principles presented in the book at both a church and a personal level.
  • Equip to make the transition from an interactive text methodology to a research-based method of study.

BIB2125 Paul’s Letters

This course is a study of the Apostle Paul within the first-century Greco- Roman context. This course surveys his thirteen letters and summarises his historical, theological, and pastoral contributions to the Christian faith. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  • Interpret Paul and his letters in light of his historical and cultural milieu.
  • Critically evaluate background issues concerning Paul’s letters.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the content of Paul’s letters.
  • Describe Paul’s theology and evaluate its implications for contemporary Christian praxis.
  • Apply lessons from the study of Paul’s letters to contemporary issues in church and society.

BIB3121 The Wisdom Books

This course covers the origin, nature and theological purpose of the Old Testament wisdom literature (Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, Psalms and Song of Songs) and brings out the relevance of these biblical books for the faith and life of the Church today. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  • Identify literature of the biblical wisdom genre.
  • Describe the five major books of wisdom literature in the Old Testament.
  • Evaluate the major theological aims of the wisdom books.

BIB3123 The Book of Hebrews

The book of Hebrews is one of the most beautifully written, powerfully argued, and theologically profound writings in the New Testament. Its central theme is to exhort readers to persevere in the faith and exhibit a life of faithfulness patterned by Jesus Christ Himself. (Term 2 & 4).

BIB3127 The Prophetic Books

This course presents a survey of the Old Testament prophetic books. It shows the importance of understanding the original context and appreciating the Abrahamic, Davidic, and Mosaic covenants as preparation for the New Covenant. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate understanding of the titles and functions of the Old Testament prophets.
  • Evaluate the hermeneutical principles that have served as the foundation for prophetic interpretation.
  • Describe the historical and social background of the Old Testament prophets.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the message of these prophetic books
  • Summarise of the message of (a) Hosea and (b) Amos.
  • Outline the theology of (a) Ezekiel and (b) Daniel.
  • Accurately interpret a passage from the prophets.

BIB3128 Genesis

The word genesis means "beginning" and the book of Genesis is the book of beginnings par excellence. The foundations of a biblical worldview are laid in Genesis. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  • Defend evangelical convictions concerning the composition and historicity of the book of Genesis. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical and theological meaning and significance of Genesis 1:11.
  • Communicate the historical, theological, and devotional significance of Abraham and Jacob (Gen. 12:36) using a storytelling method.
  • Retell the story of Joseph as a first-person narrative in a way that brings out its theological and devotional significance.
  • Describe the entire story of salvation-history.
  • See how the book of Genesis is foundational for our understanding of the nature of God, the nature and purpose of humankind.
  • See how the book of Genesis is foundational for our understanding of the divine design for marriage and family, the origin and implications of sin, the election of Abraham and Israel, and the mission of God.

BIB3129 Romans

In the Book of Romans, Paul provides the most comprehensive and systematic presentation of the gospel as the centerpiece of his theology. The argument of Romans develops five major doctrines: condemnation, justification, sanctification, election, and consecration. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the background and structure of Romans. Trace and defend Paul’s argument of universal condemnation in Romans 1:1 – 3:20.
  • Expound Paul’s teaching about the basis, means the result, and scope of justification in Romans 3:21 – 5:21.
  • Explain how and why the doctrine of justification by faith in Romans 6:8 produces holiness rather than licentiousness.
  • Analyze Paul’s argument regarding the election, rejection, and restoration of Israel in Romans 9-11.
  • Discuss the practical implications of Paul’s gospel, as laid out in Romans 12-16.
  • Apply entry-level biblical exegesis to analyse two problematic texts in their immediate, section, and book contexts.

BIB4123 Ephesians

Ephesians is widely celebrated as the queen of Paul’s epistles. It is especially relevant for Christ-followers in Africa because it deals at length with two topics of immense importance in Africa: the power of the gospel to unite people who are natural enemies and the power of the gospel to grant the believer victory and authority over evil powers in Christ. By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  • Discuss the major background issues relating to Ephesians.
  • Perform an overview study of a New Testament epistle.
  • Apply good exegetical methods to interpret a passage in a Pauline letter.
  • Conduct a detailed exegetical study of a passage in a Pauline letter.

BIB4124 Old Testament Studies

Upon completion of this course, you will have a good introductory grasp on the Old Testament as a research field with regards to content, canonicity, history, hermeneutics, literature, and theology.

BIB4129 New Testament Studies

This course introduces you to the environment of early Christianity, the cultural and social world of the early Church, the literature of the New Testament, critical issues of New Testament formation, and the theological message of the New Testament. You will gain a framework for further study of individual New Testament books and for appreciating the significance of these ancient, inspired writings for the life of the Church.