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Jesus as Torah in John 2:1-22

Author: Dan Lioy

Dan Lioy holds a ThM (Dallas Theological Seminary) and a PhD (North-West University). He has lectured at Trinity Theological Seminary, Marylhurst University, and Southwestern College. He has written several academic monographs, including ones on the Sermon on the Mount, the Gospel of John, and the Book of Revelation. He is presently a postgraduate supervisor with the South African Theological Seminary.

An examination of John 2:1-22 affirms the Fourth Gospel’s emphasis on Jesus being the divine, incarnate Torah. The miracle of changing water into wine at a humble peasant wedding in Cana of Galilee revealed that the Logos is the Creator of all things. In order to bring about overflowing joy associated with the fulfilment of the law’s messianic promises, it was necessary for Jesus to atone for the sins of humanity, particularly through the shedding of His blood on the cross.

Psychotherapy: Science or Religion?

Author: Noel B Woodbridge

Noel Woodbridge holds a DEd from UNISA and a DTh from the University of Zululand. Noel was a professor in the Faculty of Education at UNISA for 13 years before joining the faculty of the South African Theological Seminary in 2003.

The aim of this paper is to investigate the true nature of psychotherapy. In particular, an attempt will be made to answer the question: Is psychotherapy a science or a religion? It is a sad fact that today’s church has to a large extent given up its call to minister to hurting people, because Christians believe the myth that psychotherapy is a science. The paper argues that psychotherapy, in fact, is not a science, but rather another religion and that today’s church needs to return to the biblical counselling of the early church, which is far more effective than psychotherapy

Put on the Lord Jesus Christ, Put on the Last Adam

Author: Annang Asumang

Annang Asumang is a medical doctor practicing medicine in England. He holds an MTh in Biblical Studies from the South African Theological Seminary.

The background of Paul’s ethical instructions in Rom 13:11-14, that, in view of the imminent return of Christ, Christians should eschew sinful behaviour and instead live righteously, have been assumed by several commentators to have derived from a cluster of disparate images. This approach however results in an irregular and unsatisfactory appreciation of the powerful rhetorical effects of the passage.

The Emergence of Relevance Theory as a Theoretical Framework for Bible Translation

Author: Kevin Gary Smith

Kevin Smith is the Vice-Principal and Academic Head of the South African Theological Seminary. He holds an MA (New Testament) from Global University and a DLitt (Biblical Languages) from the University of Stellenbosch.

Ernst-August Gutt sparked a massive debate amongst Bible translation theorists and practitioners when he proposed that the communication theory known as relevance theory offers the best framework for understanding the phenomenon of translation. His work challenged the prevailing views of Eugene Nida and caused a divide amongst translators, some supporting a relevance theoretical approach and others criticising it.

The Heart of the Prosperity Gospel

Author: Dan Lioy

Dan Lioy holds a ThM (Dallas Theological Seminary) and a PhD (North-West University). He has lectured at Trinity Theological Seminary, Marylhurst University, and Southwestern College. He has written several academic monographs, including ones on the Sermon on the Mount, the Gospel of John, and the Book of Revelation. He is presently a postgraduate supervisor with the South African Theological Seminary.

This essay explores whether self or the Savior is at the heart of the prosperity gospel. An analysis and critique of its dogma indicates that it is predominantly anthropocentric, rather than Christocentric. This ego-focused outlook is likewise present in the health-and-wealth movement. One discovers that preachers of success are touting a religion of self in which people are the measure of all things.

Understanding the Emerging Church Movement

Author: Noel B Woodbridge

Noel Woodbridge holds a DEd from UNISA and a DTh from the University of Zululand. Noel was a professor in the Faculty of Education at UNISA for 13 years before joining the faculty of the South African Theological Seminary in 2003.

The purpose of this paper is to examine the emerging church movement (ECM) in order to come to a better understanding of its strengths in the context of a postmodern society, and its areas of concern relating to matters of doctrine and ethics. The paper concludes with remarks concerning the emerging church Movement and some implications for today’s evangelicals.